Torturing the Image of God: Reflections on Christmas, Our Current Problems, and G.K. Chesterton


IMG_0039Amidst all the glitz and glimmer of Christmas we sometimes ignore that this is one of the most important holidays on the Christian calendar. Christmas marks the celebration of the birth of God into this world, the moment when in order to redeem a fallen creation, God the Son took on our flesh in order to redeem it. While made in the image of God, we ran away from this image and denied our purpose, thus losing all purpose in living. The Incarnation serves to remedy our flaw and to bring us back to Christ. Christ came into the world to redeem it from the ills visited upon it by us, he came to save us from ourselves.

It is not without the greatest irony that as we are here during Advent, the time before Christmas, that our televisions are full of stories that run contrary to “peace on earth and goodwill toward men.” We’re told stories of how our leaders authorized torture of suspected terrorists, some of whom turned out to be innocent. We see multiple protests against the police brutality in Ferguson, New York, Cleveland, and other places. We saw Congress pass a spending bill that all but showed that they no longer regulate Wall Street, but instead are regulated by Wall Street, creating a scenario that will eventually lead our economy into another collapse. This Advent, we’ve seen stories, with increasing frequency, that show we’re becoming more depraved, more individualistic, and more of what we don’t want to be. Is this not what Christ came to stop?

We live in a fallen world, one in which difficult decisions must be made and sometimes difficult actions must be taken. But does this mean we must sacrifice our souls in order to save our lives? Must we torture someone for information, especially when this information doesn’t really do anything? Must we, like former vice president Dick Cheney, be so callously evil in our apathy towards the torturing of innocent people? While torture goes against human nature and one need not be a Christian to oppose torture, why does it seem that so many Christians embraced the CIA torture with glee? Why is it that, like Cheney, we can say that “real torture was 9/11,” as though only Americans can suffer torture? How can Christians, who ought to be humanists because God both created humans and became a human, celebrate the destruction of their fellow image bearers?

Or what do we do with the constant berating of the late Michael Brown. We’re told that it couldn’t be a case of him making a bad decision in robbing a store, or allegedly a bad decision in going after Darren Wilson. No. He must be a “thug,” he must be evil incarnate, and no matter what, we must be better off that he is dead. We must mock his death, celebrate his eradication, and not care that the image was destroyed. The same story runs for Eric Garner, John Crawford, Tamir Rice, or the many others innocent victims (especially black males) of police brutality. Or what of those who end up on my end of the spectrum, who look upon the police with suspicion in these instances? Where is our compassion for the multitude of good police, the ones who do their jobs and sometimes lose their lives in service to their community? Where is the concern for the image of God in such discussions?

Christianity is a rough religion, it is not easy, and it’s quite impossible to actually follow it with any hope of consistency. To quote from G.K. Chesterton:

“My point is that the world did not tire of the church’s ideal, but of its reality. Monasteries were impugned not for the chastity of monks, but for the unchastity of monks. Christianity was unpopular not because of the humility, but of the arrogance of Christians. Certainly, if the church failed it was largely through the churchmen…But I have only taken this as the first and most evident case of the general truth: that the great ideals of the past failed not by being outlived, but by not being lived enough…The Christian ideal has not been tried and found wanting. It has been found difficult; and left untried.” (from What’s Wrong With the World)

In the entire chapter Chesterton raises the point of how ideals are important, not because we hope to achieve them, but because we can hope to strive for them. We can hope to make the world better. A conservative looks to the past and says, “We must get back to that golden age.” A liberal looks to a utopia and says, “We must make this occur.” But a realistic idealist looks to the ideal and says, “We must strive towards this, away from the past which did not achieve the ideal, but away from a future in which we think we have obtained the ideal.” Christianity presents an ideal that, at least this side of eternity, will never be obtained.  Continue reading

“Why Don’t They Protest Black-on-Black Crime”: Why Eric Garner Must be the Last Straw


DSC02085As I was writing this post today, the media announced that the New York grand jury failed to indict an officer who killed Eric Garner. Never mind the video evidence coupled with a medical report that stated quite emphatically the death was a homicide, caused by a chokehold, the grand jury didn’t find sufficient evidence to prosecute the officer. Once again, a giant spotlight is placed on the racial divide within our country, a divide always seen by the minorities who suffer from such a divide, but one ignored by those who benefit.

In all the arguing, I’ve watched many white people try to say that racism isn’t that bad, that the system works most of the time, that black people are just complaining. Of course, there are a multitude of innocent young black men who would beg to differ that the system works. Some white people choose to respond back, “Fine, we’ll grant that the system doesn’t work, but why don’t you protest black-on-black crime? Where’s your outrage over the 95% of black people killed by other black people?

The implied message is basically, “The problem is with the race, not the system.” It seems that no matter what we argue in terms of helping the black community, we’re met with, “Let the statistics speak for themselves. Now, from the view of statistics it’s quite hard to argue that black-on-black crime isn’t an issue. Statistically, even if we remove death by police, growing up a black man comes with an inherently higher risk than growing up a white man.

What are we to make of this? Shall we continue to lay hold of the popular question, “Why don’t black people protest black-on-black crime?” Of course, while it’s a popular question to ask, it  has no basis. There are numerous protests ever year over the violence within poor black communities. There have been multiple articles, multiple programs, and multiple attempts to lower the crime rate within poor black communities. Yet, the problem persists. It leaves us with one of two explanations: Either there’s a problem with the system or there’s a problem with the race. If the problem is with the race, then we have to embrace some pretty unsavory conclusions. The first being there’s no scientific explanation between white people and black people (other than the color of the skin), thus we’re coming to the conclusion without a shred of evidence. Likewise, we must accept that the KKK and white supremacists aren’t necessarily wrong, just that we disagree with their methods. Essentially, if we conclude the problem of black-on-black crime isn’t systemic and is rather a problem with the race, then we must embrace an ideology that puts one race ahead of another.

I would hope few people would be willing to embrace such a view, especially since it lacks evidence, logic, compassion, or a Christian view. If, then, the problem is not the race, then it must be the system. Which raises a very important question; Why don’t white people protest black-on-black crime? More to the point, why don’t we protest a system that breeds poverty and violence? Why do we look upon it as “their” problem, with apathy, when it’s a problem that impacts us all? If we truly believe that human life holds intrinsic value then the loss of any life should matter to us, but even more so when the system has failed and worked to create an environment in which poverty and violence breed. Where, then, are the white protests against a system that creates such an environment? Why aren’t white people protesting the crime that exists because the system is broken?

None of this absolves criminals of their own responsibility, mind you. If a young man is in a gang and is killed by a rival gang member, then both made their choice. Even in environments geared towards producing violence, people are still responsible for their choices, but sometimes the system can influence the decisions they make. Consider the following:

We take a person and place him in a room that has a huge assortment of foods. However, there’s a giant wall separating him from the food. Likewise, there’s apples on his side of the room, but we’ve told him not to eat the apples. Now, he can get over the wall, but he has to overcome barbed wire, electric wiring, and a very narrow gap at the very top.

It doesn’t take long to realize that at a certain point, given enough people, some people are going to make it across the wall. Some will overcome the odds and get through. More, however, will give up and eat the apples. Some simply will lack the proper means to get over the wall and be forced to eat the apples. While it’s still their choice to eat the apples, the system is geared in such a way to prevent them from having better choices.

Likewise, when you take a group of people – regardless of race – and put them in an environment where there are little to no jobs, little to no education, police brutality, and rampant violence, can we be shocked if they succumb to the environment and make poor choices? Yes, we can say, “Well they should clean it up,” but how can they when the system for a number of years has worked to prevent any clean up from occurring? Up until the 70s and even 80s bias ran rampant within city officials, creating policies that negatively impacted black communities. Sadly, while these mentalities aren’t as open today, they do exist.

What do we do with a system that allows police to kill black people without any recourse to justice? A medical examiner stated that the chokehold killed Mr. Garner, labeled it a homicide, and there’s a video of the entire indicent; but that still wasn’t enough to grant justice. That is a broken system. That a man can walk in Walmart holding a toy gun and get gunned down by police without a warning while the police walk away freely is proof we live in a broken system. That a DA can make a half-assed attempt at a Grand Jury in Missouri, that he can essentially toss the case and not make an effort is proof we live in a broken system. That black men and women must worry every single time a police car pulls up behind them, even though they’ve done nothing wrong, is proof we live in a broken system. Why aren’t white people more upset, more willing to protest, more willing to change the system for their brothers and sisters?  Continue reading

The Trinity and Ferguson: A Lesson in Community and the Root Cause of Racism


IMG_0540No matter where you stand on the lack of an indictment against Darren Wilson, what’s going on in Ferguson is a tragedy. While the violence and the occasion that brought about the riot is tragic in and of itself, what makes it a bigger tragedy is it underscores just how divided we are as a nation. I’ve seen multiple Facebook posts and even a few articles filled both with explicit racism and implicit racism. Everything from, “Well what do you expect from animals” to “well, how come ‘we’ [read: white people] never riot when we don’t get our way?” Both views are incredibly racist. But I’ve also seen interviews and Facebook statuses saying that “white people are just racist, it’s in their blood.” Sadly, both approaches are incredibly racist and don’t solve the problem. They’re both very nihilistic approaches to the issue of race, essentially declaring there is no hope for the other, because the other’s problem is within his skin color.

There’s a temptation within the white community to pat ourselves on the back for ending slavery and segregation (as though the eradication of both were unilaterally done by white people). Some, especially the more liberal or social justice minded, go further to talk about how they support welfare and food stamps, so obviously they’re not racist. The implied message is, “Because I support programs for the poor, that means I can’t have anything against African Americans; I even have African American friends.” Of course, the other implied message that is missed is the assumption that the majority of people who benefit from social justice programs are somehow non-white, but the statistics show that the majority of people on social welfare programs are actually white. This doesn’t stop people on the left from stereotyping blacks, however.

Those on the right tend to be much more blatant and upfront in their racism. They just assume that rioting is something “black people do.” They’ve replaced the N-word with the word “thug,” so as to avoid the controversy. All black people who protest what happened to Michael Brown are subsequently labeled “thugs.” We’re told that the black community just needs to get it together, that they’re out of control, that they’re doing something whites would never do. Of course, they completely ignore the fact that if we fired a longtime college football coach for turning a blind eye to sexual abuse of minors we’d riot (such as Penn State did a few years ago) or over pumpkins (as this happened this year). It completely ignores that white colonials rioted against the Colonial British authorities prior to the Revolution, that whites rioted against the Irish immigrants in the 1800s, that whites rioted against peaceful Civil Rights protests in the 1960s. We also conveniently forget the most shameful aspect of American history, the lynch mobs of the early 1900s all the way up into the 1960s (and later in some places).

Racism has always existed within the United States, which points to our bigger problem; individualism has failed us. Shortly after finishing the War for Independence, early Americans were concerned about German immigrants; they weren’t Anglo and therefore weren’t “white.” Around the mid to late 1800s, the concern was over Irish immigrants, again, because they weren’t Anglo and therefore weren’t white. Then it was over Italians in the early 1900s because they weren’t from Northern Europe, they were criminals, they were thugs, they wouldn’t learn the language, and they weren’t “white.” By the 1910s to 1930s, it was Eastern European immigrants (my great-grandfather falls into this category, coming off the boat in 1912), because they weren’t “white.” In our history we’ve committed genocide against Native Americans without considering them human, we’ve enslaved millions of black people and then segregated against them, and overall we’ve been very unkind to anyone who didn’t share our skin color. Why? What is this underlying cause of racism that would cause typically good natured people to turn to the basest of human sentiments, that my color makes me better and your color makes you lesser?

To understand the cause of racism and what plagues our current condition, we must understand who we are as human beings. Within the Christian tradition there’s the belief that we’re created in the image of God. Of course, being in the image of God has nothing to do with our physical appearance as God does not have a physical appearance within his essence. Socrates and other classical philosophers described the essence of humans as rational-animals, meaning we are spiritual and thinking beings who happen to also exist within the physical realm. The animalistic part is our physicality while the rational part, what drives us and separates us from other animals, is where we find God’s image. But what does it mean to be made in the image of God?

God is Trinitarian, that is, he’s three persons within one essence. Without getting into too much detail, that means God is a community unto himself. The easiest way to think of this is as follows:

God is infinite, God is infinitely good, and God is love. Every aspect of God is without limit and is perfect. In order for love to be perfect and maximally great, it much be actualized. For instance, a married couple might love a child that has yet to be conceived, but their love will be greater once the child actually exists. Thus, if God is love and that love is maximal, it means from eternity past there had to be an object for God’s love; that love is shared within the community of God. The Father, Son, and Spirit all love each other maximally. When Christ prayed for those who would follow him, he prayed that “they would be one as we [the Father, Son, and Spirit] are one.” Christ’s prayer is that all those who follow him, all of humanity, would unite within the community of God.

When we sinned a division was placed between us, which is where racism comes from. Racism, no matter what, finds its root in a lack of community, and a lack of community finds itself in our first sin when we separated from the community of God. One of the biggest causes of racism is ignorance, typically ignorance of what other people are going through. One need look no further than the current debate over white privilege, that our system is inherently tilted in favor towards lighter-skinned people. Of course, some white people deny this is the case, but they are the recipients of the favor, so it’s hard for them to see how others are impacted by this favor. Even me as a white male who acknowledges white privilege exists still struggles at times to see the ways in which this privilege manifests itself. This isn’t because I’m a foaming at the mouth racist, but because of my racial and social status I can never put myself into the shoes of the other. I can never imagine what it’s like. But I can talk to those who suffer from white privilege, I can form a type of community with them, I can learn from their experiences, I can be a human being to them.

The underlying cause of racism, no matter the person being the racist, is a lack of community. It’s a lack of talking to and trying to see the other person’s point of view. The solution, then, is to get back to community, but community stems from God since he is the original community. The simplest solution to racism is for people to recognize that they belong to the bigger community, the one that originates with God. The solution is to listen and even befriend people who are different from ourselves.

None of this, however, ought to be construed to mean there is no diversity within community. For people who say, “I don’t see color” or “we’re all a part of the human race” would be like looking at a Rembrandt or Picasso and trying to say you don’t see the patterns or the colors. Of course there are differences within cultures (though, those cultures are not necessarily limited to or contained solely within color barriers). Having community with each other isn’t the same as monoculturalism; it’s entirely possible and ideal for differences and diversity to shine forth within a community. We learn from each other that way and even enhance our own cultural experiences.

Ultimately, the solution to our racist problem is to realize that if we claim to love God, we must first love our fellow man. There’s a reason Christ said that the greatest commandment (to love God) is similar to the second greatest (to love your neighbor); to accomplish one commandment, one must participate in the other. It is impossible to love God without loving your neighbor, and it is impossible to love your neighbor without loving God. It is also impossible to love your neighbor if you can’t first talk to him, empathize with him, and attempt to understand his experiences and his points of view. Without empathy and attempts to know your neighbor, there can be no way to fix racism.

Confessions of a White Man or, What I’ve learned from White America


Photo: David Broome Upi

Photo: David Broome Upi

Full disclosure and just to get this out of the way:

1) I am not accusing all white people of being racist. What I’m saying is that it’s far more prevalent than people realize or are willing to admit. 

2) I currently live in the South, but in an area that has a huge “immigrant” population of people from New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, and other North/Northeastern states, so take that for what you will. 

3) I understand the difference between someone making a joke (that’s a whole other debate entirely) and someone being serious. This is dedicated solely to those who are seriously racist, although they may not recognize it.

4) I’m merely attempting to point out the prejudice that I see within language and action. I also know that I’m not perfect and have my own biases to overcome; part of writing this is my attempt to overcome them. 

Dear non-white Americans (and non-Americans),

 

I want to let you in on a little secret; white people say some pretty racist things when you’re not around. Not all white people mind you, there are quite a few that honestly are not racist (at least not obviously so). There are many who are genuinely appalled when there is mistreatment of “minorities” anywhere, or when blatant racism happens to appear. Yet, there are others who aren’t so quick to come against racist actions. Yes, they quietly “tolerate” all these non-whites encroaching upon their existence and certainly don’t want to see violence done against non-whites, but they really don’t like you. I know this because I’m white and being white means other white people feel completely free to say whatever they’re thinking to me. After all, I’m safe, right?

I’ve had the following said to me in just the past three months:

“Well, I can’t really blame Donald Sterling for what he said, it was his right to say it.”

“I’d like to move out towards Montana, where people are more like you and me, you know what I mean?”

“Well, they’re just different, you know?”

“Figures that there’s rioting after they kill another n*gger.”

Now again, and I cannot stress this enough, there have been white people who have said the exact opposite of the above. They’ve shown genuine outrage towards the blatantly racist ongoings in this country, but more often than not there’s always a wink and a nudge when talking about non-whites when it’s just white people around. To be honest, I’m disgusted by it. It makes me feel uncomfortable, and most of my friends will tell you that it’s painfully obvious. But the fact is it still happens around me and, shamefully I admit, I don’t think I do enough to stop it. Especially when it was said to me as I was a bartender, because I was more concerned about my tips and job (which I most certainly would have lost if I spoke up) than I was about doing the right thing (admittedly shameful and wrong on my part).

Of course, what’s the harm? If some white people hold a racist view, but never act it out, then who really cares? It’s not as though racial prejudice is getting anyone killed anymore, right? Well, see, that’s the problem; the racist attitudes that occur in private are inherently manifested in public, causing massive problems and even death (especially among young black men).

Think about Mike Brown and the witness (Dorian Johnson) to his murder. Two young black men stopped by a police officer. Why? Perhaps he was looking for a suspect and saw two black men, who just always conveniently fit the description of someone who’s wanted. The witness was so afraid of the police that he moved out of his apartment, and for good cause. As we’ve already seen, the Ferguson police aren’t afraid of roughing up journalists and violating First Amendment rights, so why would they be afraid of a little retribution? They’ve shown absolute tyranny in how they’ve handled the community.

Yet, within the white community, the riots are looked upon as opportunistic and self-destructive. We look at the riots and go, “Well no wonder the police are acting this way!” We show absolutely no sympathy for the vast majority of protestors who have remained peaceful, yet have been met with teargas and rubber bullets. Why? Because let’s be honest; if one black man acts up, we green light the mistreatment of the entire race. For whatever reason, no one points out the fact that the community has suffered under the oppression of poverty, under a brutal police force, under false charges, random stops, random searches, mistreatment, and absolutely no relief from this treatment. The last time an authoritative government attempted to implement martial law on a bunch of white people, to impoverish them via taxation, to fire indiscriminately into a crowd, to brutalize, search, and seize white people’s property, a Revolution occurred and the United States was born. Continue reading