Contra Trump or, Am I My Brother’s Keeper?


11223477_1451611278481353_4485094499263895302_nThe current GOP frontrunner – you know, even though we’re over a year away from the presidential election – Donald Trump has stated some pretty horrible things about immigrants (legal or otherwise). Donald Trump has un-ironically called the United States a “dumping ground” for the rest of the world (forgetting the fact that every single white person in the United States descends from an immigrant). What’s quite worrisome, however, is that evangelical Christians – the largest group of Christians in the United States and a substantial part of the GOP voting bloc – happen to love Donald Trump. His famous interaction with Jorge Ramos notwithstanding, Trump’s aide was quick to tell Mr. Ramos to “Get out of my country,” even though Mr. Ramos is a US citizen. White nationalists view Trump as a step in the right direction and some even support his views on both legal and illegal immigration. There are also reports of Trump supporters inciting violence against Latinos. The point is, Donald Trump hates immigrants (both legal and illegal), his supporters are becoming violent with immigrants (especially Latinos), and somehow this guy gets the support of the evangelical Christian group.

In light of such support, I think that it is time we announce the death of something that was never alive; American Christianity. That isn’t to say that America, at one time, held to an idea of Christianity and to a culture of Christianity, but there’s never really been a “Christian America” that so many desire. Of course, at this moment, there most certainly is not a “Christian America.” Rather than a nation of those willing to follow Christ’s teachings, we are instead a nation of Cain’s, constantly asking if we are our brother’s keeper, or saying that our brother isn’t actually our brother.

We slew Native Americans without a second thought, we chased out many Latinos who had settled in the old territory of Mexico (modern day Southwestern US), and we enslaved millions of Africans. We beat and brutalized freed slaves, refused them rights, refused them respect, and looked upon them with disdain and unwarranted hatred. Along the way God called down to the Christians who participated and encouraged such acts, but they responded with, “Am I my brother’s keeper?” while the blood of their brethren cried out to God for justice.

In the modern age we see the grandchildren and great-grandchildren of former slaves kept in poverty, under the constant brutal treatment by police, and we blame “them” for such a situation. Not once have evangelicals, as a whole, truly offered to help. When a prominent Reformed evangelical can make the argument that slavery wasn’t all that bad while co-writing the paper with a member of the League of the South (a quasi-white nationalist group; quasi in the sense that their stance can be summarized as, “We don’t hate anyone who isn’t white, we just think they should act like us and follow our rules”) and is still praised by almost every Reformed evangelical out there (including John Piper), it’s easy to see there’s a problem.

And now we have a candidate who spews open animosity towards immigrants, specifically Latinos, and white evangelicals are quick to jump on board with such hatred. Such views do not function within Christian beliefs. In fact, there isn’t a form of nationalism in existence that can properly coincide with true Christianity (looking at you “Britain First”) because Christianity, by its very existence, is sans-national and multi-ethnic. There is no such thing as a Christian nation, a Christian culture, or even a Christian identity. There are creeds, beliefs, faiths, liturgies, but while all are unified in one belief, they are distinct in their existential nature.

True Christianity is by its nature diverse. After all, central to the Christian belief – so central that to remove it removes any semblance of Christianity – is the Trinity. The belief that God is one in essence, but three persons creates a religion that is founded in a paradox where both unity and diversity are needed in equal measure. The modern evangelical calls for a monolithic state, a state with one religion, one language, one culture, and ultimately one race (the implicit desire in these Trump rallies, though never explicitly stated and always openly denied). Such an evangelical is properly called an evangelical – for they’re evangelists for a nationalistic and modernistic cause – but are improperly called evangelical Christians, for their message represents nothing within Christianity. A Christianity that doesn’t allow for and appreciate diversity isn’t properly Christian.

Thus, here we are again today looking at brothers who are bruised and battered. They want to come to the United States for refuge, for jobs, for an opportunity their children can’t have. While the United States is declining and certainly full of many errors, it is still a better place than many of the places these people are leaving. We have the capacity to help them, especially if we unify and appreciate the diversity. We have the resources to help, so long as we take the drastic and necessary steps to promote economic justice. But we see our jobs sent overseas by rich billionaires (such as Trump) and make the non sequitur conclusion that immigrants are at fault for our job loss. We then take away their rights, we dehumanize them, we beat them and leave them on the streets. And so their blood cries out to God again as it is spilt on the ground, and we coldly and with narcissistic bitterness ask, “Am I my brother’s keeper?”

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Of Kentucky Clerks and Drowned Children or, What is Persecution?


Source: The Independent

Source: The Independent

Dominating my Facebook feed is the story of Kim Davis, the Rowan County clerk, refusing marriage licenses to homosexual couples and subsequently going to jail for contempt of court. It seems everyone both liberal and conservative (at least among my friends) has fierce opinions on this subject matter.

Somewhat known, but not as covered, is the disturbing photo of Aylan Kurdi, the drowned 3 year old Syrian refugee who’s body washed ashore in Turkey. I do not think it an understatement to say it is at both one of the most powerful and gut wrenching photos in the history of photography. It’s nearly impossible for a functional human being to look at the picture and not feel some sense of anger or disgust. The photo of the man holding little Aylan’s body is eerily reminiscent of the photo of the firefighter holding the dead child from the Oklahoma City bombing. The loss of life is startling, but the loss of a child’s life is more than devastating, no matter the cause.

While both Muslims and Christians are fleeing Syria, both have faced immense persecution. They did not seek to be martyrs, they did not seek persecution, they didn’t draw some defiant line in the sand; they merely followed Christ and refused to abandon him. The point is, they didn’t try to make it to the spotlight, and it’s a good thing, because the American outcry against the murders of our brothers and sisters has been near nothing. The humanitarian crisis for the entirety of the population is on a level not seen since World War II (ironically when Europeans – the same people hesitant to take in refugees – were the refugees). This is actual persecution.

What Kim Davis is doing is not persecution. In the early days of Christianity, priests and bishops forbade Christians from joining the Roman military as well as other jobs. The reason (other than early Christians almost unanimously being pacifists) is that such jobs required them to perform duties that went against Christian beliefs. In other words, if the job required them to violate their religion, then they left the job. While in the United States we do have the freedom of religion, Mrs. Davis could certainly have quit her job and then proceeded to press her rights in court. If the court sided with her, then good on her. And if they sided against her, then at least she’d already work somewhere else. As it is, from an early Christian standpoint, it would have been better for her to quit. Either way, it’s not persecution when you’re seeking to make a political statement.

Regardless of where one falls politically on such an issue, the fact remains that even if you think Davis is in the right, why is she receiving your praise and not those who died for the faith? Why does she receive your prayers, but the millions of refugees barely receive your thoughts?

Real tragedy is occurring in this world and the body of Aylan is merely us peeking into the abyss of evil engulfing the Middle East. I’m not saying we can’t stand up for social issues, but we must put equal, if not greater, effort into stopping actual evils as they are in this world. If we’re willing to stand up for a self-made “martyr,” then shouldn’t we stand up for actual martyrs and victims of war? In the end, what honors Christ more: Refusing to hand out a marriage license, or taking in a family from Syria (Christian or Muslim) because they have no where else to go?

How quickly we forget that our Lord and Savior was a refugee into Egypt, escaping the bloody persecution and bloodshed of Herod. And today we have those made in his image escaping the same lands for similar reasons. But we choose to prop up a Kentucky county clerk over the lives of the innocent? No, I refuse to partake in such a system. The Gospel is for those without hope. The Gospel is for those who are desperate for a savior. The Gospel is meant to save man, not beat him into submission. We should petition our government to bring over these refugees; God knows churches (and many members) have the resources and the space needed to house them. Not every Christian in America can house a family from Syria, but many can. So instead of wasting so much time and energy into a battle we shouldn’t be fighting, let’s put it into serving those who are suffering. Put down the protest signs and placards, drop the petitions, turn off the news, and serve. In silent service is when the Gospel is loudest.

In between these two stories there is a theme that Christians need to observe, and that’s that we ought not exaggerate our suffering and persecution lest we compare ourselves to true martyrs and victims of violence. It is also a reminder to be happy of what we have, for while both Kim Davis and a homosexual couple might go home angry at their changing world (or at a violation of their rights), the fact is they get to go home. At the end of the day they still draw breath, they still have a place to lay their head, and they aren’t fleeing for their lives. They have no worry that tomorrow morning their bodies will wash ashore from drowning while fleeing to find a safer place to live.

The Acton Institute: At the Intersection of Christianity, Capitalism, and Nihilism


Source: Pakistan Today

Source: Pakistan Today

The Acton Institute is a Christian organization that seeks to promote individual liberty based upon religious principles. Put another way, it’s a Christian organization that attempts to uphold individualism, so you can probably see where this is going.

While they do have many good things to say, overall – especially when it comes to their economic views – they tend to let conservative (Austrian) economics walk ahead of their Christian beliefs. While they do attempt to tie their beliefs back to Christianity, it’s often filtered heavily through a dedicated philosophical viewpoint; the end product is something that would appear foreign to the early Christians. Of course, the same can be said of Christian Marxists or Christian Communists who look at the book of Acts and go, “See, Communism!” But just as we think it silly to justify Communism via Scripture, it’s equally absurd to justify individualism (or laissez-faire capitalism) via Scripture.

Enter Joe Carter’s latest article, making an argument in defense of sweatshops. To give some background onto why he would do this, let me just quote him:

Liberal and conservative, right and left, red state and blue state—there are dozens, if not hundreds of ways to divide political and economic lines. But one of the most helpful ways of understanding such differences is recognizing the divide between advocates of proximate justice and absolute justice…

The primary appeal of absolute justice is its purity. Why align with compromisers and those who are satisfied with “good enough” when you can fight for full justice? Being satisfied with proximate justice sounds more like an excuse to do less rather than a principled position.

The primary appeal of proximate justice is its realism. Since absolute justice is not attainable this side of the new heaven and new earth, settling for less is the best we can ever expect. When absolute justice is our standard we can even end up allowing injustice to continue and flourish.

 

With that understanding, he goes on to write:

But first I want introduce one of the most paradigmatic, and controversial, of proximate justice positions: the defense of sweatshops.

A sweatshop is the pejorative term for a workplace that has working conditions those of us in the West deem socially unacceptable. Because of Western laws and norms, sweatshops are now found mostly in developing countries…

The absolute justice advocate would say that the working conditions in sweatshops are unacceptable—and the proximate justice advocate would agree. But the proximate justice advocate would ask, “What are the alternatives?” Invariably, the absolute justice advocate’s preference is either unworkable, unrealistic, or would lead to worse living conditions for the sweatshop worker.

Proximate justice requires that we don’t improve people’s lives or bring them justice by making their lives worse. As Benjamin Powell says, “Because sweatshops are better than the available alternatives, any reforms aimed at improving the lives of workers in sweatshops must not jeopardize the jobs that they already have.”

To summarize Carter’s own words, the argument is essentially, “Yeah, sweatshops aren’t ideal, but they’re better than nothing, so it is what it is.” He points out that in places such as China, while we might find the conditions deplorable, the Chinese factory workers like it because it’s better than the alternative:

What Chang is saying is that whether we understand or agree, the Chinese workers believe accepting their current working conditions is better for them than their realistic alternatives and that the work will help them to life a better life. Many of us intuitively understand this point because it has to with meeting material needs (e.g., without the factory job the workers might not be able to feed their families). What we have a harder time understanding is when people endure less-than-optimal working conditions for other needs, such as self-actualization.

Thus, the argument boils down to that while things might not be ideal, they’re better than an alternative, or, it’s better to be a slave than to starve. Now Carter would certainly object to such a summary, but his objection would be without merit as it’s almost word-for-word what he says, only without the round-about way of saying it.  Continue reading

Further Thoughts on Planned Parenthood or, Why Not the Church?


IMG_0330The debate and controversy over abortion might seem relatively new, something arriving in the last century, but in the ancient world the practice of abortion wasn’t entirely uncommon. Both the Greeks and Romans engaged in it, as well as infanticide. The early Christians, unsurprisingly, forbade abortion and infanticide. The morality of protecting human life within Christianity is a constant from our foundation to the present day, but how that life is protected has changed. In our earliest days the Church would take care of women or abandoned babies, helping them along the way. Today we protest and petition Caesar, whereas in the ancient days Christians protested the action, but petitioned the heart. Therein lies the difference.

With all the controversy surrounding Planned Parenthood and its utility to a community contrasted against the abortions it provides, there’s one question few people have asked: Why has Planned Parenthood supplanted the Church? Why is it that a pregnant woman, unable to provide for her pregnancy, is sooner found knocking on the door of her local clinic rather than her local church? Even if she doesn’t seek abortion and instead seeks medical aid, the Church seems to be the last place she’ll go. It seems that we’re faithful to our roots in keeping our morality, but not in living our morality.

What is the greater harm to the world; a doctor selling the parts of a baby, or a Christian refusing to provide church funds to help a pregnant woman because she “conceived in sin?” Perhaps we could argue over which is worse – and certain trafficking and profiteering in human body parts ranks up there – but it’s impossible to deny that our actions are somewhat responsible for the current evils. What if, when a woman needed prenatal care, she knew she could go to her local Church and they could at least get her in with the right services? What if she knew a local member who would employ her and give her maternity leave, without fear of losing her job? What if she knew that all her needs – and the needs of her child – could be met by the simple act of walking into a Church? Even with the State’s blessing on abortion, surely we’d see abortion rates plummet.

Perhaps our problem is we see the abortion debate as a debate over an issue and not over persons. Abortion, as a term, is quite abstract. As someone trained in philosophy I can sit here and provide solid arguments on why a fetus is a human being with certain rights and never once mention religious reasons, but such a debate often ignores the realities of the world. After all, once aware a Holocaust was taking place in Europe, the world did not engage in academic debates over whether it was right or wrong, but acted against it. Likewise, there is no real debate over the rightness or wrongness of abortion, everyone, at some level, knows it’s wrong. But few, especially within the Church, are taking action against it beyond calling for legislative change. I believe we act this way because we treat abortion as an issue and not as a crisis of humanity.

Yet, abortion is a crisis in every sense of the term. That a woman feels her only resort is to kill her child in order to get by in life indicates she faces crises in her life, that pregnancy is the last one and she cannot handle it. Abortion is the act of taking one life, but always takes two souls; the body of the child is crushed and destroyed and the soul is lost, but the mother’s soul faces years of pondering and regret thereafter. Abortion is always a tragedy, for both the child and mother, for while the two are separate, they are linked.

The solution to ending abortion is to act as our forefathers did, to engage the person and serve the community. Where our ancestors had an advantage – they were unified and didn’t have thousands of denominations to overcome – we are disadvantaged, but the present time requires us to put aside some differences for the common good. Perhaps we can pool our resources and begin to offer an alternative, a better organized alternative, to Planned Parenthood. While we may never be unified in the time of the Divine Mysteries, perhaps we can find enough unity to protect life and bring a little more light into this dark world.

Lions, Tigers, and Humans, Oh My! About the Life and Outrage


Kevin Carter's famous Pulitzer Prize winning photo, 1993

Kevin Carter’s famous Pulitzer Prize winning photo, 1993

As everyone has heard, Walter Palmer of the United States shot Cecil the Lion in Zimbabwe, causing international outrage and making people hate dentists even more than usual. People are rightfully upset; the lion posed no threat to Palmer, he merely wanted to mount the head (and leave the body) as a trophy, the death served no purpose, and worst of all, the killing was illegal. People are (rightfully) calling for prosecution against him. Others have gone a bit further, arguing that we ought to capture him, hunt him, tie him down, and skin him alive. Of course, such suggestions are hyperbolic, but the rage is there.

Where we aren’t seeing any anger or rage, however, is over other doctors choosing to kill humans and sell their body parts. The videos are so upsetting that even Planned Parenthood’s staunch defender Hillary Clinton admitted that the organization ought to be investigated. Imagine if Jimmy Kimmel broke down in tears over this controversy, or Piers Morgan called for the killing and selling of the doctor’s body parts. Why is it that a lion – majestic though it is – gains more sympathy and attention than a human being, who is infinitely more majestic than a lion?

Rage also lacks in multiple other areas. There are no celebrities shedding tears over the fact that one in three people in sub-Saharan Africa face hunger and starvation on a daily basis, or that nearly half (46%) live on less than $1.25 a day. Africa remains a continent in crisis, but we avoid outrage because such outrage would demand action, and action requires work, and we’re lazy. It’s understandable and noble to be upset over the unjust killing of an African lion; but it’s inexcusable to lack any feeling or outrage over the death or suffering of an African human.

Rage lacks – at least for the white portion of America’s population – for African-Americans who live in fear of the police. A week can’t go by where we hear about another innocent black man (or recently, black woman) getting killed by the police under suspicious circumstances (at best). Yet, more energy is spent over the unjust death of a lion than the unjust death of a black man in an Ohio Walmart, or black child in an Ohio park, or black woman in a Texas jail cell.

The saying “life is cheap” isn’t exactly true; for Dr. Palmer to kill Cecil the Lion it has cost him his business, his reputation, and – hopefully – his freedom. The man deserves justice for what he has done, there is no doubt. Life, for Dr. Palmer, certainly isn’t cheap and comes with a cost. But, there is a certain truthfulness to the saying if we simply say, “Human life is cheap,” unless of course you’re Planned Parenthood, in which case human life is quite profitable.

Lord knows we can’t be outraged over every act of murder, over every loss of life, as we’d simply stew in anger for the rest of our days. It seems that as humans we sometimes require violence on our brethren almost as much as we require oxygen. Their blood is our water, their body is our bread in some twisted, evil, demonic version of the Eucharist. Perhaps, however, we should show some outrage over the loss of human lives. Not just hashtags on Twitter, but protests and – hopefully – action. Not on a legislative level, but on a personal, communal level.

We can ask the government to investigate Planned Parenthood (and we should require such a thing), but we can’t ask them to investigate the life of a woman considering an abortion. Only on the local level can a community come together and help such a woman and provide care. We can ask the government to send money and food to Africa, but we can’t ask them to do so in a sustainable way. After all, such an action is basically neo-colonialism, and colonialism is what got Africa into this mess in the first place. Until we begin to help Africans make Africa stronger on a personal and communal level, we won’t see much change. We can ask the government to put laws in place that keep police accountable, and we should, but there’s only so much they can do. Until the community – especially the white community – stands up against police abuses against African-Americans and other minorities, nothing will change in any drastic way.

Human life is valuable by virtue of being human. Human life is more valuable than any other type of life on this planet. That doesn’t give us an excuse to abuse such life (because we are dependent upon it, and they are still God’s creation and we are their stewards, not masters), it does mean that for all the noble and justified effort we put into preserving animal life, we ought to put at least as much into preserving human life. After all, when we cheapen human life, whether that life belongs to a fetus, a person of a different color, or a person of a different nationality, we inherently devalue our own life as well.

There is no “Us or Them”


“We reject the either or
They can’t define us anymore
Cause if it’s us or them
It’s us for them
It’s us for them”

– Gungor

Last year Gungor released a delightfully dark, lyrically deep, and musically sophisticated album entitled I Am Mountain. Michael Gungor, the band’s founder and front man, also wrote an honest and insightful blog exploring his doubts about biblical literalism and fundamentalism. As a result, they were heavily criticized and even anathematized by many conservative evangelicals (Cf. Ken Ham, Q90 FM Radio, & Al Mohler).

On a personal note, I was living in Wake Forest at the time the controversy broke out and very disappointed when, at the last minute, Southeastern Baptist Theological Seminary canceled a Gungor concert I had been planning to attend for six months.

Gungor recently released a new song entitled “Us for Them” (which is embedded above). I find the song both moving and inspiring; especially in the wake of the tragedy in Charleston and the backlash regarding the recent Supreme Court ruling on same sex marriage. Nevertheless, I suspect, it will only embroil Gungor in even more controversy.

The reason for this is simple: it calls for us to love unconditionally. 

Rejecting the Either/Or

Gungor’s song decries our fallen tendency to divid people into categories (e.g., white/black, cool/uncool, rich/poor, educated/ignorant, gay/straight, etc.), to stigmatize and judge, and to segregate and hate. This is the either/or that Gungor rejects and which fuels their declamation against those who would “define us”. Many, however, will misunderstand the message. They will, instead, interpret it as an attack on objective truth.

After all, one might argue that, to reject the either/or distinction is to violate the law of non-contradiction; literally to say that A is both A and Not-A at the same time and in the same sense. If this is true,”Us for Them” advocates the logically absurd and is, ultimately, a misguided call for us to embrace moral relativism.

To interpret the song in this way, however, would be misguided. For Gungor is not attacking the laws of logic, nor are they denying the possibility of objective truth. They are, in fact, doing the exact opposite. They are affirming the objective existence of the God who is love and who loves all men unconditionally; and calling for us to follow His example. 

Two Ways of Viewing Humanity

Broadly speaking, there are two ways of viewing humanity. The first way denies that human beings have an essential nature–i.e., a “what-it-is” to be human. According to this view, humanity is merely a random collection of accidental properties and what it is to be human is contingent upon the vacillating whims of society and individuals.

The second way affirms human beings have an essential nature–i.e., that there is a “what-it-is” to be human. According to this view, humanity is more than a mere random collection of accidental properties and what it is to be human is an objective feature of reality. This means that what it is to be human does not depend upon accidental features of individual human beings (e.g., the color of your skin, your social status, your sexual orientation, etc.).

Christianity views humanity in the second way.  It maintains people are essentially good, in as much as they are made in the image and likeness of God. For the Christian, all human beings are intrinsically valuable and worthy of love in spite of their accidental properties. This means that you are valuable, you have dignity and worth, and are lovable, in spite of the way you look, the level of your IQ, or the things you’ve done.

It is the second way of viewing humanity, through the eyes of Christ, that Gungor’s new song champions. As such it stands squarely against those who define and judge other human beings in terms of some accidental feature of their existence. It is, thus, opposed to any worldview that would cause us to hate another human being due to their race, age, religion, or sexual orientation.

“Our Only War is Love”

To reject the either/or–i.e. humanities fallen tendency to divid, categorize, and judge others based upon accidental features of their existence–is to call for us to love one anther as Jesus does: unconditionally.

To embrace the way of love is literally to wage war on our fallen dispositions and against the fallen world system. It is to stare in the face of ISIS with open arms, as Jesus did on the cross: praying for the very people who murdered him.  It is to look at all of humanity, regardless of their sins, and to see the very image of God; to see that there is no “us or them.”

It seems appropriate to close with these words from St. Maximus the Confessor:

“For him who is perfect in love and has reached the summit of dispassion there is no difference between his own or another’s, or between Christians and unbelievers, or between slave and free, or even between male and female. But because he has risen above the tyranny of the passions and has fixed his attention on the single nature of man, he looks on all in the same way and shows the same disposition to all. For in him there is neither Greek nor Jew, male nor female, bond nor free, but Christ who ‘is all, and in all”

Christians are Facing Persecution in America: Church Burnings and Racism


Chuck Burton / AP

Chuck Burton / AP

Since the Supreme Court decision on Friday the talk is about the coming persecution of Christians, but we act like persecution isn’t already occurring within the United States for Christians. The fact is, Christians in the US have faced persecution since its foundation; the constant threat of being beaten for prayer, for being arrested for going to church, or for even having that church burned (or bombed). Of course, we don’t often think of Christians being persecuted in America because what we mean is we’re afraid of white Christians facing persecution: The black church has faced persecution from its foundation, and continues to face that persecution.

Consider that in just five days, six traditionally black churches were burned to the ground. Not in the 1950s, but in 2015. Yet, the media has remained mostly silent on the issue. That’s simply how it’s been for a number of years. The African American community has fear when pulled over by the police, has fear in their own neighborhoods, and has fear when they go to church.

If a pro-homosexual group or atheist group were burning mostly white churches, there’d be constant news coverage, constant Facebook updates, and the whole circus would show up. As it is, however, these churches represent the African American community, and therefore no one is really talking about it or doing anything to challenge the fact that it’s happening.

An African American church faces a gunman and nine people die. Six African American churches burn to the ground. All of this happens within a week. But it’s the gays getting married I’m supposed to worry about. But what about my black brothers and sisters, who simply wish to worship the same Christ I worship, must fear for their lives in attending their houses of worship. How can we not see that persecution is already here? How can we refuse to act or do anything to help?

I wish I had an answer, but I don’t. I wish I could place some big conclusion here that wraps up everything above, but I can’t. I can’t because it seems that for all our effort to remove the Confederate Flag, we’re unwilling to remove the racism that flag represents. That racism turns into persecution and attacks the central aspect of most African American communities (especially in the South), the church. I wish I could say things will get better, but it seems that most Christians will choose to keep their eyes glued to gays getting married than to the actual persecution that continues to their black brothers and sisters. That the world and media would ignore the plight of our black brothers and sisters is bad enough, but somewhat expected. That we would is shameful and sinful, and it has to stop. Our refusal to deal with the problem of racism – a mostly one-sided problem stemming from white people – is getting people killed and perpetuates fear within the black community. It has to stop.