The Oppression of Life or, Jesus Didn’t Just Die for Your Sins


IMG_0684The atheistic philosopher Jean-Paul Sartre famously stated, “Existence precedes essence.” Boiling down the meaning of this, we come to the idea that there is no purpose in life beyond the purpose we give to life. You’re not born with a destiny, things do not happen for a reason, and you cannot escape the fact that meaning does not exist within this life.

Whether you help an old lady across the street or rob a liquor store, it doesn’t matter; 4.6 billion years from now our sun will expand and consume the earth. Any memories of what you did will be lost forever, all of this long after you have turned into dust. What you do today has no real ramifications for tomorrow, no ramifications beyond what is immediately important to you. Of course, what is important to you is dictated by you and you alone.

It is into this world that Christians must speak, not as a voice of opposition to such meaninglessness, but as a voice of approval. The entire Christian narrative rests upon the idea that sin has entered the world. In Genesis 1-2 humans were created to follow God and be with Him, to grow in Him and rely on Him. In Genesis 3 humans rebelled against their purpose in life. Adam and Eve turned away from their created purpose and tried to make their own purpose. In doing so, they cursed the world and their descendants to a life without purpose. If God is our purpose and our wills are turned away from God, then we cannot know our purpose. Hence the reason we live in a world that has no meaning. God gave meaning to creation (“It is good”), but we robbed the world of that meaning.

Into this meaninglessness, well-intentioned Christians speak a highly incomplete message of, “Jesus died for your sins.” They go door to door and make “Jesus died for your sins” the rallying call and central message of the Gospel. Deeper down, this view comes from placing Substitutionary Atonement as the centerpiece of the Gospel message, which is a faulty thing to do. We make sin and Christ’s absolution of that sin to be the biggest possible thing that Christ accomplished both on the cross and in His resurrection. However, this is no different than being at a carnival and bragging about someone paying for your ticket through the gate; you’re in the park, go play rather than dwell on being in the park.

In many ways, the absolution of our sins is the most significant thing for us and the most insignificant thing for us. It is significant because without the forgiveness of sins we have no way to restore communion with God. However, the forgiveness of sins is merely the gate of this communion. Being born is the most significant thing in your life because it brings you into this world. Yet, it is the most insignificant thing in this life because if all you accomplish is that you exist, then you’ve done nothing with your life. The same is true for having one’s sins forgiven; it’s great because it opens the pathway to communion, but it’s incredibly insignificant if one’s salvation is solely defined by, “I’m forgiven.”

Rather, Christ came into the world to restore the meaning back to the world. He took on human flesh to give meaning back to being human. When Christ forgives us of our sins, this is merely a stepping stone into the greater plan of salvation, which is the redemption of all things that exist. Redemption means that meaning is put back into their existence (or is finally sin). Whereas sin blocks us from seeing the meaning of life, the absolution of sin allows us to see the meaning of life, but we must in turn act on this meaning.

What, then, is the meaning of life once free from our sins? Christ stated that the two greatest commandments is to Love God with our entire being and to love our neighbor with our entire being. In other words, the meaning of life is love, but a love far deeper than just doing nice things for people. Marriage is the perfect icon of this love. In marriage, two people [ideally] become one flesh, sharing everything and sacrificing for each other. In many ways, they become one person because they are unified. We too are called to be unified to God in love, to draw so close that His will becomes our will. In addition, this love should unify us as a human race. Thus, the purpose of our existence is to love; the removal of our sins is but a mere stepping stone to this overall goal, though it is a part of the path one must take.

Thus, as Christians we would serve the world better by telling them that Christ came to give them a whole life and not just end the message at, “He died for your sins so you wouldn’t go to Hell.” More consistent with teaching this message is living this message. It’s in feeding those who are starving, clothing those who are cold, visiting those who are in prison, giving water to those who are thirsty, and freedom to those who are oppressed. The Gospel is more than an intellectual thing to be heard because the Gospel is a call to find meaning in this life, meaning in love. Love is not something that can solely be taught, but must also be experienced. The same is true for the Gospel; before one can truly accept the Gospel, one must also experience the Gospel, and that is done primarily through its adherents. You can knock on a door and tell people that Jesus died for their sins, or you can offer to help the person and then tell them about a Christ who has restored meaning to life.

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4 thoughts on “The Oppression of Life or, Jesus Didn’t Just Die for Your Sins

  1. Good stuff! Too often we’ve over simplified the gospel to “fire insurance” — being forgiven to get out of hell. When, in reality, the gospel is about a new way to live and love.

  2. Well-articulated and thought out. I don’t think I fit under this umbrella, as I’m not a Christian, but speaking from a theoretical theological perspective, I absolutely agree with your sentiments. I especially thought this part was potent:

    “Being born is the most significant thing in your life because it brings you into this world. Yet, it is the most insignificant thing in this life because if all you accomplish is that you exist, then you’ve done nothing with your life.”

    However, I would disagree philosophically that there is no meaning in life without God. While true, everything we are and will be and have ever been will cease to exist when the sun burns out. In the same token, however, I nor anybody else will be around to document such an event (theoretically), so why not live in the moment here and now when one can indeed document it? I think our lives have meaning by virtue of our humanness, empathy and expression of love to others. From a purely scientific point, there is no meaning, sure, but morality and meaning exist beyond the admittedly limiting parameters of science.

    Very interesting post. Thank you for encouraging some worthwhile thought.

  3. Reblogged this on Ginger Musings and commented:
    Fascinating perspective on Christianity and how Christians ought to understand the message. I’ve offered my own thoughts in response:

    Well-articulated and thought out. I don’t think I fit under this umbrella, as I’m not a Christian, but speaking from a theoretical theological perspective, I absolutely agree with your sentiments. I especially thought this part was potent:

    “Being born is the most significant thing in your life because it brings you into this world. Yet, it is the most insignificant thing in this life because if all you accomplish is that you exist, then you’ve done nothing with your life.”

    However, I would disagree philosophically that there is no meaning in life without God. While true, everything we are and will be and have ever been will cease to exist when the sun burns out. In the same token, however, I nor anybody else will be around to document such an event (theoretically), so why not live in the moment here and now when one can indeed document it? I think our lives have meaning by virtue of our humanness, empathy and expression of love to others. From a purely scientific point, there is no meaning, sure, but morality and meaning exist beyond the admittedly limiting parameters of science.

    Very interesting post. Thank you for encouraging some worthwhile thought.

  4. Joel, I can’t thank you enough for this post. Well articulated. It’s really going to help me have better, more fruitful conversations with my family. I’m a reformed believer who grew up in a family of fundamental independent Baptists. The differences in our theology have unfortunately caused distance within our relationships as well…nothing the Gospel can’t overcome, but I struggle to relate and have true fellowship. It’s almost feels like two different religions entirely. Thanks again,
    Carrie Burke (Raleigh, NC)

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